The SQ-Ai Battery Holder and its Contacts

One of the more popular posts on this blog explains how to prevent the button cells in the SQ-Ai from slipping away from the camera contact, using nothing more than a piece of cardboard. This still leaves a problem for those who are missing the battery holder altogether.
About the only alternative to an expensive motor-grip or external pack is a 3D printed replacement holder. Luckily, there is a design freely available. This of course leaves open the question of how to design the electric contacts. I have never tried this, so the best I can do is produce some more detailed photographs. Let’s start with a view of the contact side of the battery holder with a basic scale.

Picture 1

This side shows the contacts of the battery holder: the holes in the middle provide access Continue reading “The SQ-Ai Battery Holder and its Contacts”

Miranda Solo Panorama Doubleplusungood

A fair number of shitty cameras have graced the pages of this blog. They will all be under-performed by today’s example: the Miranda Solo Panorama.

The Miranda Solo Panorama is one of these very basic reusable cameras with all the technological sophistication of a disposable one. It sports a 28mm wide angle lens, fixed focus, a single exposure time (probably 1/60-1/125 or thereabouts) and an aperture like f11 or Continue reading “Miranda Solo Panorama Doubleplusungood”

Mamiya C330 Shutter Not-firing? Three non-issues to rule out before sending it for repair.

The Mamiya C330 TLR is currently gaining popularity. Deservedly so, it is a widely underrated medium format camera. Judging by online discussions of the C330, one frequent problem is a sticking shutter. So if you are new to the C330 and your shutter does not fire, here are three non-problems to identify before you send the camera or lens for a repair & service: Continue reading “Mamiya C330 Shutter Not-firing? Three non-issues to rule out before sending it for repair.”

Resuscitating an analogue Canon EOS300

As analogue photography regains popularity, a frequent question in photography forums is, which cheap, good quality analogue camera to pick when trying out film. Until recently, this would not have been an issue: almost all analogue gear was cheap, but prices have been rising for a while. In spite of this: late SLR models from the 1990s and beyond are often overlooked. 

Where the main motivation is the look and feel of old or purely mechanical gear, this makes sense. But those who mainly want to try film as a medium and get the most bang for their buck should look at late analogue SLRs. They are likely to look like digital cameras but offer everything a film camera can, from full manual control to point and shoot automation. Continue reading “Resuscitating an analogue Canon EOS300”